Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Men's mental health is an important topic that often doesn’t get enough attention, especially in the workplace. Men's Health Week is a great opportunity to highlight the unique challenges men face, particularly in industries dominated by men, like construction, manufacturing, and other manual jobs. These environments often uphold outdated masculinity standards, which can really erode men’s mental health and the stigma about asking for help can be a real barrier to receiving the right support. This blog explores the impact of workplace culture on men's mental health, some of the challenges they face, and strategies for creating a supportive work environment.

Statistics show that men are less likely than women to seek mental health treatment, even though they experience similar issues. Men make up only 36% of all NHS referrals for psychological therapy, indicating a significant gap in accessing care. According to the Men's Health Forum, 46% of men would feel embarrassed or ashamed to tell their employer they need time off for mental health reasons, and 52% would be anxious about doing so.

Several factors contribute to the mental health issues men face in male-dominated industries, in particular, social expectations and cultural standards. The societal pressure on men to uphold outdated ideas of masculinity, such as self-reliance and stoicism, often prevents them from seeking support, and avoiding vulnerability around mental health can also lead to isolation and untreated issues, which only get worse.

Employers can address these concerns however, by being mindful of their employees' psychological needs and putting strategies in place that support mental health, which really can have significant benefits for the workplace as a whole. When employers provide mental health care, their employees' overall happiness, productivity, and well-being improve. In fact, research shows that companies with strong mental health initiatives have lower absenteeism and higher employee retention rates.

On the other hand, if mental health concerns remain unaddressed, it can have major repercussions for both individuals and organisations, reducing performance and increasing the risk of accidents and general mistakes, all of which also increase business costs.

Organisations can incorporate various strategies however, to nurture their employees' mental health and help change the culture and expectations around men’s mental health:

Encourage Open Conversations: Promoting open communication about mental health helps reduce stigma and fosters a welcoming atmosphere. There is powerful opportunity here for those in leadership to step up and make a difference, possibly sharing their own experiences or at least talking about mental health as a topic and encouraging others to do the same. Frequent workshops on mental health awareness, maybe with different themes, can also be helpful.

Skills Training: Providing employees with training on coping mechanisms, stress management, and strategies for resilience gives them the tools they need to manage their mental health effectively.

Peer Support Networks: Creating peer support networks like Mental Health First Aiders and TRiM practitioners among staff can promote a sense of belonging by allowing them to help and share experiences with each other.

Self-Care Techniques: Promoting self-care techniques among staff, such as mindfulness, regular exercise, and a balanced diet, can help them maintain their mental health. Before starting any wellbeing initiatives it can be really useful to do a survey and learn what things your teams are more receptive to. Over the years, we’ve been quite surprised by some of the wellbeing initiatives that have proved the most popular in male-dominated, manual worker environments including through-the-clothes massage and Reiki.

Addressing men's mental health at work benefits both the individuals and the organisation as a whole. Employers can significantly enhance the mental health of their male staff by creating a welcoming atmosphere that promotes open discussions, offering specialised training, and providing peer support. Implementing these principles can lead to a more engaged, productive, and dedicated workforce. Additionally, by breaking the stigma attached to mental health problems and encouraging self-care, we can ensure that men feel empowered to get the support they need, resulting in a more balanced and healthy work environment.

And remember, think small steps. Making lots of little changes over time will have a greater impact on workplace culture rather than trying to make one gigantic shift, which can leave people wary and less willing to engage.

Sources:

Statistics - https://mentalhealth-uk.org/mens-mental-health/

Greiner, Birgit A et al. “The effectiveness of organisational-level workplace mental health interventions on mental health and wellbeing in construction workers: A systematic review and recommended research agenda.” PLOS ONE 17 (2022): n. pag.

Hulls PM, Richmond RC, Martin RM, et alWorkplace interventions that aim to improve employee health and well-being in male-dominated industries: a systematic reviewOccupational and Environmental Medicine 2022;79:77-87.

Bondar J, Babich Morrow C, Gueorguieva R, Brown M, Hawrilenko M, Krystal JH, Corlett PR, Chekroud AM. Clinical and Financial Outcomes Associated With a Workplace Mental Health Program Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic. JAMA Netw Open. 2022 Jun 1;5(6):e2216349. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.16349. PMID: 35679044; PMCID: PMC9185188.

Corpuz JCG. Workplace Mental Health in Schools. Workplace Health Saf. 2023 Apr;71(4):160-161. doi: 10.1177/21650799221147171. Epub 2023 Jan 25. PMID: 36695164.

Waddell, Alex et al. “How effective are interventions in optimizing workplace mental health and well-being? A scoping review of reviews and evidence map.” Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health 49 (2023): 235 - 248.

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

Harnessing Movement: Elevating Mental Health in the Workplace

Within the bustling world of modern work culture, mental health awareness has evolved from a mere buzzword to a meaningful focal point. As the UK observes Mental Health Awareness Week, the spotlight is shifting towards an often overlooked but effective strategy: movement. In a realm where sedentary jobs often reign supreme, integrating movement into the workplace emerges not only as a physical necessity but as a powerful tool in nurturing mental wellbeing.

Why do physical activity and movement have such a strong influence on our mental equilibrium? Science offers a captivating description. Physical activity releases endorphins, which are miraculous neurotransmitters eminent for their euphoric properties. These endorphins, also known as the body's natural mood elevators, flood our system during exercise, giving us a sense of satisfaction and decreasing stress and anxiety levels.

Research supports the importance of physical activity in mental health. Regular exercise has been demonstrated to lower stress levels and increase our bodies' ability to withstand stress through physiological and biochemical processes. Moreover, literature has also suggested the importance of physical activity in the workplace. Physical activity at the workplace leads to decreased anxiety, improved psychosocial wellbeing and sleep. Another study indicated that physical activity at the workplace is linked with decreased anxiety, depression, and stress and better general wellbeing in the employees. Thus, including movement in our workday habits can therefore be beneficial.

Although individual efforts to incorporate movement into daily work routines, such as taking the stairs, walking or cycling to work, and enjoying lunch outdoors, are essential, it is critical to acknowledge the significance of administrative-level initiatives in fostering long-lasting change in employees' workplace lifestyles.

However, how can the workplace transform into a haven for movement and a mental health retreat? Learning and Development practitioners, HR, and Health and Safety professionals are responsible for leading this revolutionary path. Companies can foster a culture that supports mobility by incorporating it into everyday tasks. One way to add energy and vitality to the workday is to organise short stretching sessions during breaks, implement standing workstations, or even encourage walking meetings.

Furthermore, the emergence of remote work opens up new possibilities for integrating mobility into the workplace. Virtual fitness competitions, wellness webinars with exercises that can be done at a desk, or gamified applications that reward movement can all help close the physical distance between employees and bring the energy of physical activity into the digital sphere.

However, physical activity and movement's importance goes beyond simple physical exertion; it represents a fundamental paradigm change in favour of holistic wellbeing. By cultivating a work environment that values mobility, companies demonstrate their dedication to supporting their workers' mental and physical wellbeing.

As the theme for Mental Health Awarness Week this year in movement, it represents the perfect opportunity to consider how increasing activity levels in your working day can positively impact on mental health for yourself and for others.

Sources:

“Happy feet”: evaluating the benefits of a 100-day 10,000 step challenge on mental health and wellbeing. Hallam, Bilsborough & Courten, BMC Psychiatry volume 18 (2018)

Moving minds: Mental health and wellbeing benefits of a 50-day workplace physical activity program. Hallam, Peeters, Gupta & Bilsborough 2022

Exercise and Mental Health, Maturitas, Mikkelsen, et al. 2017

Association between physical exercise and mental health in 1.2 million individuals in the USA between 2011 and 2015: a cross sectional study. The Lancet Psychiatry. SR Chekroud et.al. 2018

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

 

 

Did you know that it's National Stress Awareness Month throughout April 2024?

 

The campaign aims to enhance understanding of the causes and solutions related to stress and mental health while also working to diminish the stigma associated with these issues.

 

At Resilient People, we're dedicated to the idea that prioritising mental health is key to a thriving business — it's a strategy for nurturing growth, innovation, and a culture of support.

 

We know raising awareness can be time consuming and so, in support of NSAM 2024, we're offering a free poster download for your workplace. You can display or use the poster’s key messages to build awareness around stress and poor mental health.

 

Download Your Free Poster Here

 

We hope the poster is useful, and if you have questions about our in-house and open courses please do get in touch.

 

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

National Volunteer Day

It's National Volunteer Day!

At Resilient People, our dedication to enhancing mental wellbeing extends beyond the confines of the office; it's embedded within our community outreach.

Our team regularly completes community volunteering hours with local organisations as well as raising funds for charities close to our hearts through completing activities such as the Yorkshire Three Peaks, Coffee Mornings and even marathons.

Getting your teams volunteering with worthy causes is a great way to enhance a sense of purpose and meaning; both of which are big protective factors for mental health. 

 

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

Understanding TRiM Training? A Quick Guide

 

Introduction: What is TRiM  Training?

TRiM, or Trauma Risk Management, is a structured training program designed to help individuals and organisations effectively manage and mitigate the psychological impact of traumatic incidents. Originating from the military, TRiM has gained recognition and importance in various settings, including the workplace.

TRiM training equips participants with skills to identify signs of distress and support colleagues who may have experienced traumatic events. It emphasises early intervention and peer support, fostering a culture of psychological well-being and resilience. In the workplace, TRiM can help reduce the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder, absenteeism, and productivity losses due to trauma-related issues.

By promoting open communication and timely support, TRiM enhances employee mental health,  making it a valuable tool for managing trauma-related challenges in diverse work environments.

A background to TRiM Training

From Military Roots to Civilian Applications

TRiM, initially developed in the military during combat operations, aimed to address the psychological toll of combat on soldiers. It involved peer support, early intervention, and structured discussions to identify and manage trauma-related issues. Recognising its effectiveness, TRiM principles were adapted for civilian use in various organisations. In non-military settings, TRiM focuses on workplace trauma, adapting its framework to address incidents such as accidents, disasters, or critical incidents. It promotes a supportive environment, encouraging colleagues to look out for each other, recognise signs of distress, and provide timely assistance. This civilian adaptation fosters psychological resilience and well-being among employees and team members.

The Development of TRiM Protocols Over Time

TRiM protocols have evolved to align with changing understandings of trauma and stress management in diverse environments. From their military origins, they now encompass a wider range of traumatic incidents in civilian settings. This evolution involves recognising the varying nature of trauma, including workplace accidents, natural disasters, and acts of violence. TRiM also emphasises cultural sensitivity and inclusivity, acknowledging that different individuals and groups may respond differently to traumatic events. By adapting to these changing dynamics, TRiM continues to be a valuable tool for promoting psychological well-being and resilience in a variety of environments

Key Components of TRiM Training

Understanding the Risk Assessment Matrix

The TRiM Risk Assessment Matrix is a key tool for evaluating and managing trauma-related stress. It involves assessing individuals' exposure to traumatic events and their reactions. It categorises individuals into risk levels, ranging from low to high, based on their likelihood of developing stress-related issues. This matrix helps organisations prioritise support and intervention for those at higher risk, ensuring timely assistance.

Peer Support Systems in TRiM

In TRiM training, individuals are trained to provide crucial peer support post-incident. They learn active listening skills, empathy, and how to recognise signs of trauma-related distress in their colleagues. The training encourages open and non-judgmental communication, allowing individuals to share their experiences and feelings. Trained peers offer emotional support, help identify those who may need further assistance, and guide them toward appropriate resources. This peer support system creates a supportive and resilient workplace culture, where colleagues can effectively help each other cope with the aftermath of traumatic events.

The Goals and Objectives of TRiM Training

Immediate and Long-Term Aims of TRiM

TRiM's immediate goals are early identification and support for individuals experiencing trauma-related distress. Its long-term objectives include reducing the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by providing timely assistance. By addressing trauma early, TRiM aims to prevent long-lasting psychological impacts and promote overall well-being in individuals and organisations.

The Role of TRiM in Fostering Resilience

TRiM training focuses on building resilience within teams and organisations by fostering a culture of mutual support and emotional readiness. It equips individuals with the skills to identify signs of distress, offer timely peer support, and encourage open communication. This collective resilience not only helps individuals cope with trauma-related stress but also strengthens the overall organisation's ability to handle traumatic events effectively, minimising long-term psychological impacts and maintaining operational readiness.

Conclusion

TRiM training is vital for many organisations as it equips employees to effectively manage workplace trauma, while fostering a culture of support and resilience. By early identification, peer support, and reducing the risk of PTSD, TRiM safeguards employee well-being and promotes psychological safety. Investing in the mental health of employees with courses like TRiM can minimize the psychological impact of traumatic events, reduce absenteeism, enhance team cohesion, and ultimately promote a healthier and more productive work environment.

Ready to chat about our TRiM and Trauma Prepared courses? Get in touch 

TRiM course page

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

More Fundraising!


Congratulations to Estelle, one of our brilliant directors, who conquered the Yorkshire Marathon in support of the children's charity, Zarach. The above shot captures Estelle gracefully crossing the finish line with an impressive time of 4 hours and 5 minutes! What an outstanding achievement!


We recognise that addressing mental health concerns is more than just offering training courses. Many societal inequalities contribute significantly to mental health challenges, with childhood poverty being a particularly profound influencer.


It's shocking to think that countless children go to bed each night feeling cold, hungry, and without a proper bed of their own.
Zarach stands as a beacon of hope, providing beds and essentials for children grappling with poverty. Just £150 can supply a 'Bed Bundle' – comprising a new bed, mattress, duvet, pillow, bed sheets, pyjamas, and a hygiene kit.


While Estelle has surpassed her fundraising goal, generous contributions continue to pour in. If you'd like to support her mission, please follow this just giving link:

https://www.justgiving.com/page/estelle-penrose-1696182577101


Your generosity is much appreciated. Thank you

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

Resilient People Proudly Sponsors Collingham Women’s Football Team!

We are thrilled to announce that Resilient People is now the proud sponsor of the Collingham Women's Football Team! At Resilient People, we believe that positive mental health can be a way of life for everybody. That's why we promote connection, meaning, and building resilience in the workplace. Our sponsorship of the Collingham Women's Football Team embodies these values. The team is all about teamwork, perseverance, and achieving goals.

We’re especially excited because Estelle, one of our directors, is also a feisty defender for the Collingham team. Her involvement with the team is a living testament to the incredible synergy between physical and mental well-being. Just as we promote resilience and mental wellness in the workplace, Estelle and her teammates exhibit those very traits on the football field. It’s a match made in heaven!

The link between good physical health and mental health is undeniable. Studies have shown that regular physical activity can reduce stress, anxiety, and depression. It also improves mood, boosts self-esteem, and enhances cognitive function. Physical exercise triggers the release of endorphins—those feel-good hormones that act as natural mood lifters. Moreover, being a part of a team fosters a sense of community, belonging, and mutual support. These are elements that can significantly improve your mental health and overall sense of well-being.

By sponsoring the Collingham Women's Football Team, we aim to spotlight the importance of integrating both mental and physical health into everyday life. We're eager to cheer on the team as they aim to dominate this season, and equally eager to share their journey as a prime example of resilience in action. So, whether you're a seasoned athlete or just someone looking for a little inspiration, remember: looking after your body means looking after your mind.

Go CWFC!!

The Resilient People Team

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2023

 

Anxiety is the focus of Mental Health week in 2023 and here we explore how it impacts on the Workplace

Background

Anxiety is a widespread and serious issue facing millions of UK employees today. It often goes undiagnosed and unsupported, leading to negative impacts on both mental health and work productivity. In the workplace, employees suffering with anxiety can experience a broad range of issues, including difficulty concentrating, increased stress levels, and decreased job satisfaction.

The Problem

For those suffering from anxiety, even simple tasks can become overwhelming, significantly impacting their ability to accomplish their job responsibilities. As a result, employees may feel isolated from their colleagues, leading to a sense of detachment and disengagement from the workplace. Furthermore, anxiety may cause employees to become fatigued, especially regarding decision-making, which can lead to poor job performance, low morale, and even job loss.

Improving the Situation

It’s becoming more of an accepted fact that employers today need to prioritise workplace wellness by taking proactive measures to support their employees' mental health. By investing in initiatives that prioritise mental health, such as Line Manager Training and Mental Health First Aid, employees are provided with the necessary resources to manage their anxiety more proactively. Additionally, workplaces that foster a supportive work environment that allows for open communication about mental health issues can help reduce the stigma surrounding anxiety and encourage employees to seek help when needed.

Next Step

If you would like to learn more about how Resilient People can support your organisation’s mental health plans simply use the website’s contact box and we’ll be back in touch pretty quick!   

We also have a free poster to download and share with your colleagues, if you would like  https://tinyurl.com/4mryveh2

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

National Stress Awareness Day – 2nd November 2022

Stress is a part of everyday life and can often feel unpleasant. Generally, we don’t like ‘unpleasant’ and so we try to make it stop, which can, in turn, lead to more stress and unpleasant feelings. A better approach can be to learn techniques to get through the moments of stress, so-called ‘weathering the storm.’ Here are some strategies that use the senses for grounding effect when the stress feels like it is becoming too much:

Sit back in your chair and notice 5 objects in the room with you – this may be something simple like a pen. Visually study the object, taking in as much detail as possible – size, colour, marks etc. When you have finished studying one object move onto the next.

 

 Switch on to your hearing. Like smells, there are often subtle sounds around us that we do not normally notice. Take a few minutes to really hear these sounds – try not to react to them with thoughts – just notice them and wait for the next one.

 

Take some long, deep breaths through you nose (aim for 6-7 breaths per minute) and notice the air moving through your nostrils. Also, notice any smells. There are   always subtle smells we rarely notice   and becoming aware of them can be a great grounding agent. If you have the time, you might want  to try the same exercise outdoors.

 

Start by noticing your body’s contact with the chair you are sitting on – feeling the pressure on the back of your legs. Then notice the contact between your feet and the floor. How about the clothes you are wearing? Can you feel their contact with your skin?

 

Focus your attention on your mouth, first noticing any tension in your jaw, and then noticing any tastes in your mouth. Simply spend a few minutes noticing the different tastes and sensations as they come and go.

 

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

Regroup, Revisit, Revive: Refreshing Skills for Resilience and Positive Psychological Health in the Workplace

Regroup, Revisit, Revive

Refreshing Skills for Resilience and Positive Psychological Health in the Workplace

 

Now may be a time that you are preparing for a transition back to the workplace for your teams, either full time or flexibly. As well as the emotional and logistical challenges that your teams might be facing, new ways of working and changes in processes might bring role-specific challenges to the forefront.

Whereas in the past, meetings, day-to-day duties and processes may have included face-to-face discussions and routines, remote working has meant that often this in-person part of the process has found itself to be surplus to requirements. While this has often streamlined the way we operate, it can also leave members of the team feeling like their role is undervalued or that it might even be under threat.

Equally, remote working or changes in processes may have been rolled out quickly due to necessity and a return to the workplace or previous structures may identify some areas where the process has fallen down and standards decreased. Returning to the workplace, even flexibly, might highlight to employees areas where they feel deskilled, causing further anxiety and worries.

Rebuilding a sense of engagement, ambition and connection in your organisation may need to be an immediate focus as we move through the transition of returning to work in whatever new or traditional form that might take. As well as building in the opportunity to regroup and revisit goals and values of your organisation, giving members of your team the tools to thrive and be resilient is paramount. A time of transition can be a trigger for emerging mental health concerns, as well as exasperating existing conditions

For current Mental Health First Aiders or Line Managers, the additional pressures of supporting employees through mental ill health can be a very real worry and they too may feel deskilled in their ability to recognise and support mental health conditions and issues in the workplace.

Now is an excellent time to refresh the skills and knowledge of your leaders and Mental Health First Aiders to ensure they feel confident and efficient in their roles to support their colleagues with any of these concerns.

 

 

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

11.06.2024

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

10.05.2024

Mental Health Awareness Week 2024: Movement

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024

27.03.2024

National Stress Awareness Month – April 2024