National Stress Awareness Day 2023

Did you know that National Stress Awareness Day 2023 is on 2nd November?

It's a day dedicated to recognising the impact of stress and championing healthier ways to cope and support one another.

At Resilient People, we passionately believe that good mental health should be at the heart of every business. It's not just a feel-good initiative; it's a way of doing business that fosters growth, innovation, and a strong, supportive culture.

We know raising awareness can be time consuming and so, in support of NSAD 2023, we're offering a free poster download for your workplace. You can display or use the poster’s key messages to build awareness around stress and poor mental health.

Download your copy

One small step at a time, let's keep working towards a future where mental well-being is everyone's business!

Would you like to know more about our open and in-house training courses in Mental Health (including Mental Health First Aid) and Trauma (including TRiM)? Contact Us

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National Stress Awareness Day – 2nd November 2022

Stress is a part of everyday life and can often feel unpleasant. Generally, we don’t like ‘unpleasant’ and so we try to make it stop, which can, in turn, lead to more stress and unpleasant feelings. A better approach can be to learn techniques to get through the moments of stress, so-called ‘weathering the storm.’ Here are some strategies that use the senses for grounding effect when the stress feels like it is becoming too much:

Sit back in your chair and notice 5 objects in the room with you – this may be something simple like a pen. Visually study the object, taking in as much detail as possible – size, colour, marks etc. When you have finished studying one object move onto the next.

 

 Switch on to your hearing. Like smells, there are often subtle sounds around us that we do not normally notice. Take a few minutes to really hear these sounds – try not to react to them with thoughts – just notice them and wait for the next one.

 

Take some long, deep breaths through you nose (aim for 6-7 breaths per minute) and notice the air moving through your nostrils. Also, notice any smells. There are   always subtle smells we rarely notice   and becoming aware of them can be a great grounding agent. If you have the time, you might want  to try the same exercise outdoors.

 

Start by noticing your body’s contact with the chair you are sitting on – feeling the pressure on the back of your legs. Then notice the contact between your feet and the floor. How about the clothes you are wearing? Can you feel their contact with your skin?

 

Focus your attention on your mouth, first noticing any tension in your jaw, and then noticing any tastes in your mouth. Simply spend a few minutes noticing the different tastes and sensations as they come and go.

 

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Mental Health: Another Burden On The Youth

Guest Blogger Emily Owen, 16, writes about the stress and pressure that teenagers and young people are faced with

Many adults dismiss stress in teenagers as they don’t believe they have anything to stress about just because they don’t pay bills or have a job, but they have more stress now than adults had when they were teenagers with intense school expectations and regular exams, all to prepare for an entire month of back to back exams that are said to ‘dictate the rest of your life’. Though teenagers may experience stress like an adult, they cannot deal with it as they would, which is why it’s important to support any young people with stress and help them deal with it in a way which suits them.

Worryingly, around 82% of students suffer from stress and anxiety with 1 in 10 young people suffering from a mental health disorder. This shows how much pressure is on people in education nowadays, to the point it is causing them to fall ill and to suffer from stress, anxiety and depression.

Symptoms of stress to look out for are high irritability; trouble sleeping; a big weight change due to over or under eating; and being unable to relax. Most young people will find themselves stressed due to pressures from schools, whether it be due to upcoming and ongoing exams; large amounts of work both in school and at home; and fast approaching deadlines for assignments and essays. However, there could be other stresses in their lives such as peer pressure to do things they aren’t comfortable with so that they fit in and avoid bullying from their friends. This, combined with the pressure from school, could have a very negative effect on their mental health.

Stress affects people in two ways: physical and emotional. Teenagers and students suffering from stress from school may experience headaches, muscle pains and tension, chest pains and sleeping problems which in turn lead to fatigue. Due to the physical symptoms, high amounts of stress left untreated can lead to other health issues such as high blood pressure. Emotional symptoms include anxiety, sadness and frustration, which can all fuse together to make people feel worse, and untreated the symptoms can lead to depression.

Luckily, there are ways to manage stress with things such as regular physical activities and being surrounded by people that are found to be trustworthy, such as family and friends. It’s recommended to use ‘active’ ways to relive stress as ‘inactive’ ways, such as watching TV and playing video games, could lead to increased stress in the long term. If the stress is too much and methods like this do not help, it’s encouraged to seek help through mental health treatments such as therapies and by possibly joining support groups.

Emily Owen

Addressing Men’s Mental Health in the Workplace: Building a Supportive Environment

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